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English is, as pointed out a Germanic language with a large Romance element of vocabulary, but it is a Germanic language. Of the 100 most common words used in our language 99 are Germanic, only the word "very" being Romance. I'm a little confused by this desire to amend the spelling ...
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Tue Dec 05, 2006 2:14 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Letters as Representations of Sounds
Replies: 18
Views: 9089

My understanding was that the macron is a modern invention and was never used by the Romans - it was adopted in textbooks for students of the language, especially with regard to poetry.
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Tue Dec 05, 2006 1:51 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Pronunciation questions
Replies: 4
Views: 3138

Latin translation...

Salvete omnes

Excuse the subject matter, but what Latin word would you use if you wished to describe someone a "spammy"? :oops: Was there a Latin equivalent for this concept (I can't imagine there not being one!!)

Gratias ago

Valete
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Tue Feb 21, 2006 6:00 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Latin translation...
Replies: 1
Views: 1698

Quick translation request

Have been asked, what would "Lost Lands" be in Latin? The person who asked me suggested "terra absentia" but I am not happy with the word absentia - that is medieval latin. Any classical latin suggestions?
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Thu Dec 01, 2005 1:06 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Quick translation request
Replies: 8
Views: 2998

How do you translate...

Salvete omnes

How do you render "too" Latin, as in "his feet are too big!"

Gratias ago
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Thu Nov 10, 2005 4:04 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: How do you translate...
Replies: 3
Views: 1981

Btw, Prime, could you please correct the title of this topic (or if you can't change it anymore, could our aediles ?) ? It should be SeptimIUS Severus (it is a mistake often made, don't worry ).


Apologies, but I am unable!
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Tue Nov 08, 2005 6:40 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Historicum
Topic: Septimius Severus
Replies: 11
Views: 4939

Septimius Severus

There's currently an argument on the BBC History message boards about whether Emporor Septimus Severus was black or not. Anyone got any thoughts, and does anyone know of any contemporary sources that may shed some light on this?

Gratias ago
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Fri Nov 04, 2005 3:50 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Historicum
Topic: Septimius Severus
Replies: 11
Views: 4939

Always happy to oblige, although I did make a bit of an error with my explanation. :oops: I said that in making the 'k' sound the tongue goes to behind the teeth, well this isn't exactly correct. The 'k' sound is produced in the velum area in the mouth further back at the top of the mouth. Other...
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Fri Nov 04, 2005 2:22 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Latin tips and tricks
Replies: 40
Views: 23628

Gratias Omne! Im still confused as to where the S sound of C's come from that we have in the European languages.. C's were pronounced like K in the Germanic tounges as well, hence we have Kaiser and King and Knight(originally pronounced K-night). So if C's were pro. like K in both languages,where ...
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Thu Oct 20, 2005 2:11 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Latin tips and tricks
Replies: 40
Views: 23628

[quote="Gnæus Dionysius Draco"]what I meant by atrocious names are things like "Gerardus", which is nothing more than a non-Latin name with -us sticked to it at the end. While at least Gerardus would sound a bit like older Latin, there are also combinations possible which include sounds an...
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Thu Apr 14, 2005 8:51 am
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Classical v Mediaeval Latin
Replies: 14
Views: 4518

Thanks Draco - I was more interested in the grammar side to be honest. I was aware that the pronunciation differed and was generally influenced by the local dialect/language. For example the medieval latin in England differed to that of say Spain, and towards the latter half of the middle ages Lat...
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Fri Sep 03, 2004 4:11 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Classical v Mediaeval Latin
Replies: 14
Views: 4518

Classical v Mediaeval Latin

Salvete omnes I've been reading about the Battle of Hastings recently and therefore have been looking at the Bayeux Tapestry and noticed that the Latin in use on the Tapestry differed slightly to Classical Latin, and got me thinking about how Mediaeval Latin did differ from the language of Cicero...
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Fri Sep 03, 2004 2:05 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Classical v Mediaeval Latin
Replies: 14
Views: 4518

Very

How is 'very' (as in to qualify an adjective) translated into Latin? Is the superlative used instead of an adverb?
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Fri Aug 27, 2004 4:04 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Very
Replies: 4
Views: 1585

Salve Draco Thanks for the little description on Dutch dialects - not too much info at all. As someone interested in linguistics, especially sociolinguistics (which includes dialectology) I find that very interesting. I found the formation of plurals of interest, that the more western parts of ...
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Fri Aug 20, 2004 11:17 am
 
Forum: Collegium Historicum
Topic: Anglo-Saxons
Replies: 6
Views: 2814

Salve Draco I have found a website with the three tribal names - they are Ingvaeones, Irminones, and Istvaones. The website with some info on them is: http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Ingvaeonic Seems that they refer to tribes from the North Germany area so could be used in relatio...
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Wed Aug 18, 2004 6:01 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Historicum
Topic: Anglo-Saxons
Replies: 6
Views: 2814

Salve Draco Tibi gratias ago - I know what you mean about native anglophones not learning foreign languages well. Having been bought up in England a lot of my compatriots haven't a clue when they are abroad, embarrasingly so! It always annoys me to go to places like Spain and see fellow Brits e...
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Wed Aug 18, 2004 5:44 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Linguistically challenged...?
Replies: 4
Views: 1627

Salve Curio I would have thought that there wold have been some contact with the tribes that eventually settled England, as although traditionally people thought that the Anglo-Saxon tribes came from (modern) Denmark and northern Germany, these days it is pretty much well accepted in hostorical c...
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Tue Aug 17, 2004 11:54 am
 
Forum: Collegium Historicum
Topic: Anglo-Saxons
Replies: 6
Views: 2814

Linguistically challenged...?

Not so much a Latin question, but I do have a language question. Did the Romans ever write or show any interest in any other languages other than Latin and Greek? I understand that Aramaic and Hebrew were commented on by the Romans, as were Etruscan and the other Italic tongues in the Republic d...
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Mon Aug 16, 2004 3:14 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Linguistically challenged...?
Replies: 4
Views: 1627

Anglo-Saxons

I was wondering what evidence the Romans left us with regard to the Germanic tribes that would eventually come to invade and then settle in England (i.e. the Angles, Saxons, Frisians, and Jutes) around the 4th centry onwards? As the Rhine was the Empire's boundary for so long, there must have been ...
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Mon Aug 16, 2004 2:59 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Historicum
Topic: Anglo-Saxons
Replies: 6
Views: 2814

Ancient Greek language

We know that (Classical) Latin of Cicero et al was a written ideal and not spoken as such as anyone's fist language (everyone spoke vulgar Latin, from which the modern Romance languages developed), but what of Ancient Greek? What was the status of Ancient Greek that we would learn today? Is that h...
by Quintus Marius Primus
on Thu Aug 05, 2004 2:02 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Ancient Greek language
Replies: 1
Views: 1128
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