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I have always been amazed by the way Christianity transformed the empire from being tolerant of most religions (if they did not endanger the state) to intolerant of all other religions, and intolerant even of certain kinds of Christianity. I don't think intolerance is a necessary condition of Chris...
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Sun Jun 08, 2008 3:36 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Historicum
Topic: The Sad Reign of Theodosius
Replies: 9
Views: 3265

Remember the barbarian chieftan in Tacitus, in his work on Agricola, I think? "They [the Romans] create a desert and call it peace." I doubt many of the peoples of the empire considered the Romans to be liberators. I think the Romans were unabashed imperialists, and that very few peo...
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Fri May 23, 2008 1:17 am
 
Forum: Collegium Militarium
Topic: The Ancient Romans were Liberators!
Replies: 22
Views: 8074

I have always been fascinated by Roman history. But what induced me to seek out and find SVR, and want to say "civis romanus sum" were two things, primarily. First, an interest in stoicism. Long ago, as a student of philosophy, I studied utilitarianism, pragmatism, and analytic philos...
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Sun May 11, 2008 3:44 pm
 
Forum: Introductions
Topic: Romanitas Rising
Replies: 24
Views: 10357

Latin in a strange, limited form is alive and well in the law. Lawyer-latin we can call it perhaps. Nunc pro tunc, per stirpes, sine die, the ever popular res ipsa locquitur, ejusdem generis, for example. You should hear lawyers' pronunciation. But it is interesting, and a testimony to the power...
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Sat May 10, 2008 2:27 pm
 
Forum: General
Topic: Latin Language in Everyday Lives
Replies: 5
Views: 1373

For my part, I think CIVIS ROMANUS is a fine idea. Then I would be able to say, with Paul of Tarsus, "civis romanus sum", though I hope to avoid his end.
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Sat May 10, 2008 2:19 pm
 
Forum: General
Topic: Board-Ranks and Citizenship
Replies: 17
Views: 3020

Well said, cousin. The comparison with Hannibal is quite appropriate. After all, Napoleon also descended from the Alps into Italy (twice) and won great victories there, which all came to nothing when he was finally defeated.
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Sat May 03, 2008 3:02 am
 
Forum: Collegium Historicum
Topic: Napoleon Bonaparte, Roman emperor or Roman wannabe?
Replies: 8
Views: 3095

Ave, Cleopatra Aelia There is something fascinating about the martial arts, and it may be that what attracts you to them also attracts you to the Via Romana--what more martial people have existed than the ancient Romans? I took escrima lessons for a time, until I found a club at which I could ...
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Sat May 03, 2008 2:54 am
 
Forum: Ludi Societatis
Topic: How to become a gladiator ;-)
Replies: 1
Views: 1210

Because of his many victories as a general in the field, Napoleon probably merited the military title "Imperator" more than most Roman emperors. And I think post-revolutionary France under him looked to ancient Rome as a model, in the creation of the consulate and then the empire. He was...
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Sat May 03, 2008 2:40 am
 
Forum: Collegium Historicum
Topic: Napoleon Bonaparte, Roman emperor or Roman wannabe?
Replies: 8
Views: 3095

Many thanks for all of the replies. I have a lot of reading to do.
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Thu May 01, 2008 4:02 pm
 
Forum: Ludi Societatis
Topic: Ludus Latrunculorum
Replies: 4
Views: 1811

Ludus Latrunculorum

Salve: I am a chess aficianado (what would be the appropriate latin term?), a club player of no great skill, but I love the game and am interested in its history. Latrunculi seems to be the closest equivalent in ancient Rome. The object was apparently to immobilize your opponent's king by sur...
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Sun Apr 27, 2008 3:12 pm
 
Forum: Ludi Societatis
Topic: Ludus Latrunculorum
Replies: 4
Views: 1811

Of course you can treat me as a cousin! Just don't call me graeculus.

Vale
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Sun Apr 27, 2008 1:58 am
 
Forum: Introductions
Topic: Please allow me to reintroduce myself
Replies: 7
Views: 3035

Thank you for the replies. To Marcus Lupinius Paulus: I am familiar enough with the kind of lawyer you refer to. You are right not to be intimidated. A certain amount of self-confidence is required in a lawyer, particularly a litigator, but arrogance is unseemly. To Valerius Claudius Iohane...
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Fri Apr 25, 2008 1:02 am
 
Forum: Introductions
Topic: Please allow me to reintroduce myself
Replies: 7
Views: 3035

Please allow me to reintroduce myself

I have now joined (and been accepted by) SVR and, assuming I have done what is required to properly change my profile, will in the future be appearing here under the name Marcus Tullius Ioannes, the name by which I have registered with SVR. Nevertheless, as I suppose can be inferred from my new n...
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Wed Apr 23, 2008 4:20 pm
 
Forum: Introductions
Topic: Please allow me to reintroduce myself
Replies: 7
Views: 3035

Schiller's dictum seems especially appropriate in this case: "Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain." Freedom of speech does allow and even requires the airing of objectionable beliefs. There is a temptation to limit that freedom as a result, and one sees this increa...
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Tue Apr 15, 2008 1:40 am
 
Forum: General
Topic: Fellow Romans, I need help!
Replies: 14
Views: 2571

I suppose I should also mention Robert Graves' novels regarding the emperor Claudius, in case you have not read them--I, Claudius and Claudius the God. PBS (or BBC?) did a good series based on them years ago, which I assume is available on DVD.
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Wed Apr 09, 2008 9:46 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Artium et Litterarum
Topic: A Plea
Replies: 9
Views: 3043

You might want to try Robert Harris' novels, Pompeii, the subject of which is evident, and Imperium, about the early career of Cicero. But for me, Vidal has no rival.
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Sun Apr 06, 2008 5:41 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Artium et Litterarum
Topic: A Plea
Replies: 9
Views: 3043

I would bring back the attitude of religious tolerance which seems to have existed in the Empire (except in Judea) before the advent of Christianity. The notion a particular god is the only god, and that all must believe in a particular god, in a particular way, appears to have been absent for the ...
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Sun Apr 06, 2008 4:38 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Vitae Quotidianae
Topic: If you could bring something back, what would it be?
Replies: 25
Views: 14516

How does one explain that tai chi is considered a marital art, albeit an "internal" one? Granted, its forms are based on what I understand to be actions or movements used in the external arts (my personal favorite is "Repulse the Monkey"), but is it correct to call it a "ma...
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Sun Mar 23, 2008 3:42 pm
 
Forum: Ludi Societatis
Topic: Greco-Roman martial arts
Replies: 10
Views: 4194

Salve omnes. What I find striking about Epicurus' view of living according to nature is its profound materialism. As I read him, he believes that all we can know is derived from the senses. Therefore, it is impossible to conceive of virtue, for example, or the good life, in any way that is not ...
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Sun Mar 23, 2008 3:22 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Religionum et Philosophiarum
Topic: Stoicism and Epicureanism
Replies: 10
Views: 4913

Thank you for the reply.

Perhaps I should consider trying to join one of the Societas. I have been browsing through some of the essays and articles, and wish I had been around to participate in the Trial of Cicero--as a member of the defense team, of course.
by Marcus Tullius Ioannes
on Sat Mar 08, 2008 8:23 pm
 
Forum: General
Topic: New Board-Rank Proposal
Replies: 30
Views: 7820
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