On the Roman Web

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On the Roman Web

Postby Aldus Marius on Tue May 01, 2007 4:32 am

Salvete, amici Romani!

This topic is for sharing discussion highlights of the other Roman message-boards and blogs we may visit on our rounds...just to let each other know what's going on out there! Anyone can go to these sites, enjoy the discussions, and even participate if they like. Romanitas is where you find it--and if you find something, post it here! >({|:-)

Today's entry: Recent topics on the Rogue Classicism blog kept by sodalis Numerius Papirius Cursor (David Meadows to the rest of the world).


- Classics Under Attack in the UK
- Latin Mass Update
- Aeneas' Landfall?
- Roman Paintings Found in London
- St. Paul's Tomb Update
- Roman Remains in Croatia
- Classical and Byzantine Studies at Oxford
- Greek and Roman Love Poetry Podcast
- Maxentius' Regalia Update
- Reviews

...and a job opening teaching Latin Literature and Roman History at Roehampton University (C'mon, *some* of our perennial students must've graduated by now! <g>)

The URL:

http://www.atrium-media.com/rogueclassicism/


Noster Q Valerius Scerio also has a blog, this one called Thoughts on Antiquity. I'll be posting abstracts from there, too, as I pull them together; I'm still exploring; the whole thing is most impressive! Its addy:

http://www.neonostalgia.com/

This will get you to the blog, a discussion forum, and even a Latin IRC channel.

Enjoy!
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On Neonostalgia.com

Postby Aldus Marius on Wed May 23, 2007 6:50 am

Salvete iterum, Internautae Romani!

As I've already mentioned briefly, Valerius Scerio has a blog and forum, called Thoughts on Antiquity and Ancient Mediterranean Cultures, respectively. Their theme is New Testament scholarship (emphasis on the scholarship), Mediterranean civilisation, and the intersection between them. Here's what they've been talking about recently:

On the Forum:

- Herculaneum Library
- Sources for Caesar's Life
- 8th-century BCE Rome
- Was Iulius Caesar Religious?
- Lucretius and the Empire
- A Lost Work of Hypatia?
- Question about Socrates
- Orphic Hymns
- Euclid's Elements
- Latin Prepositions
- Loeb Library
- Aesop's Fables

On the Blog:

- Plautus on "the most miserable of men"
- Egyptian courtier's tomb found
- Book: In Quest of the Historical Pharisees
- Poggio Bracciolini, Classical preservationist extraordinaire
- 'Q' and the Historical Jesus
- Translation: Cyprian, De duobus montibus Sina et Sion


The Forum, btw, is using software by Simple Machines, the way ours uses phpBB. I have subscribed to a few Simple Machines fora (SMF) and have found them to be way more stable, easier to use, and more featureful than the format we have here. I have definitely grown used to not having a down day, being able to report Spam to the admin just by clicking a button, and being able to attach my own pics without having to have the admin upload them for me.

One of these days we might consider changing the Forum to SMF or another format (there are several other good ones out there). Relax, it wouldn't be soon. But it wouldn't hurt to register on an SMF Board like Scerio's, use it enough to get a feel for it, and decide for yourselves if you like it better than this one.

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Insanely great! (eClassics.com)

Postby Aldus Marius on Wed Jun 06, 2007 6:47 am

Avete amici!!

I've just been introduced to eClassics.com...and I am crazy in like!

The site (motto: "More Wired than a Roman Internet Cafe!!") describes itself as a place where "Students and teachers of Latin, ancient Greek, and Classical literature can exchange ideas on the role of technology in the Classics classroom here. Share your stories and ideas, Titus-like triumphs, or Trojan-like defeats with colleagues world-wide."

But there's way more here than pedagogical brainstorming. There are all kinds of delightful projects going on here, including enough Latin to keep noster Scerio happy. But here; I'll let today's digest speak for itself...

A sampling of the new content posted this past week on eClassics:


New Discussions: Actual Classroom Technology Use, Collins v. Wheelock, Retaining First-Year Greek Students

New Blog Posts: Enhanced Podcasts, podBooks, and GPS Phone Scavenger Hunts; Technology and Historical Reenactors; Blogging for Vergil (classroom success story); Free Greek Handouts/Tutorials/Links; Pedagogical links from Laura Gibbs

New Videos: Terentius Tunberg et Caelestis Eichenseer, The Latin Movie (the beginning of the world as told by Hesiod and a remarkable 7th grade Latin class)

New Links: Another source for Latin podcasts, Latin crossword puzzles, learning Latin via fables

"Please check back often as I update content almost daily -- you are able to add your own content and comments as well. Feel free to join!"

http://eclassics.ning.com

Andrew Reinhard, eLearning Coordinator
Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers
areinhard@bolchazy.com


Bolchazy-Carducci is the largest publisher I know of for Living-Latin learning materials, with excellent coverage of both the language and cultural sides of the house.

(Mi Scerio--I am not kidding! Besides The Latin Movie [work-in-progress], crosswords, original fables, podcasts, you-name-it, there is also Audio Latin; Latin via Proverbs; Latin Sudoku; and quite a few of the contributors comment in Latin, on matters ranging from Wikipedia to Wild Bill Hickock.)

(Oh, and on any percieved similarity between eClassics and any other wide-ranging classics blogs, the owner says: "...I think David Meadows' coffee is stronger than mine." >({|:-)

Enjoy--I know I will!!

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Rogue Classicism this week

Postby Aldus Marius on Wed Jun 06, 2007 7:00 am

Speaking of wide-ranging classics blogs...here's David Meadows' Rogue Classicism for the week:

Departments:
- This Day in Ancient History
- Classical Words of the Day
- Nuntii Latini

Features [1-5 Jun]:
- Temple of Quirinus?
- Asterix Silliness
- Awwwwww
- Solarium Reconstruction
- d.m. Christiane Sourvinou-Inwood
- Scanning Homer
- Romans in India Again
- Romans in Mendip
- A Hundred Amphoras

Call for Papers: Reception of Greek and Roman Drama
Conference: Pollution and Propriety
Conference: Villa of the Papyri
The Ancient World on TV


There's quite a bit more from since the last time I posted about them too. Go have a look...and tell ol' Asterix there's at least one 'crazy Roman' out here that his buddy Obelix overlooked! <g>

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Postby Helena Iulia on Thu Jun 07, 2007 6:47 am

Mari, gratias ago for the link to Dickinson College. They have latin poetry and I was able to download one of the poems (for some reason I couldn't seem to get the rest) to my i-pod. Anyway, it is nicely done and I will enjoy it even more when I translate it (they actually have a translation but I won't remember unless I work at it myself). Thanks again,

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Good stuff on Rogue Classicism this week!

Postby Aldus Marius on Sat Jun 23, 2007 6:23 am

Avete, amici Romani!

Some interesting topics on this week's Rogue Classicism:


- Zeugma Mosaics
- Pompeii Houses Reopen (+)
- Latin-Mass Update
- Latin Diplomas at University of Ottawa
- Roman City Wall Found
- Archaeological Playing Cards
- Say What?
- Holy Grail in Rome?
- "Dame Osthenes"
- New Chief of Antiquities at the Getty
Call for Papers: Contemporary Art/Classical Myth
Call for Papers: Valuing Others
Conference: Greece, Rome, and Colonial India
Conference: Pompeii in the Popular Imagination


I really appreciate that the blog's owner, Papirius Cursor, puts out these little "What's New" bulletins two or three times a week. I'd never have the time to visit each blog and compile a digest myself; but I do like knowing what's out there, and sharing it with my friends.

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Recently on Rogue Classicism

Postby Aldus Marius on Sun Nov 04, 2007 6:49 pm

Salvete, amici Romani!

Numerius Papirius has just moved his Rogue Classicism blog onto his screaming new machine; he sends this update, and invites everyone to come check out the site and notify him of any problems he might have overlooked:


Regular Installments:
- This Day in Ancient History
- Classical Words of the Day
- Nuntii Latini

Features [3 Nov]:
- Rethinking Wikipedia
- More Items Returned to Greece
- Rethinking Aegean Chronologies
- Odds and Ends
- Roman Tombstone from Scotland
- CONF: The Healing Power of Ancient Literature
- Private Museum
- Reviews
- New (sort of) Online Books


That URL again: http://www.atrium-media.com/rogueclassicism//index.html

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This Week on Rogue Classicism

Postby Aldus Marius on Mon Nov 12, 2007 6:49 am

Salvete iterum amici,

This week on Rogue Classicism:


- Hic et Illic
- Wilfred Owen: Strange Meeting
- Barry Baldwin's Classical Corner: Cross Talk
- The Guardian Looks at Mary Beard
- If Cleopatra had a Publicist...
- In Theatro (Reviews)
- Acropolis World News
Call for Papers (Undergrad): Roman Buildings on Coins


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GoogleEarth Ancient Rome!

Postby Aldus Marius on Thu Jan 01, 2009 2:52 am

Heia! Look what I got from amicissimus C Aelius Ericius! (He notes, "This sounds maxima cool.")

From David Meadows' (Numerius Papirius Cursor's) Rogue Classicist blog (Original article at http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/no ... born-italy ):


Its creator has called it a "virtual time machine" – a digital reconstruction of ancient Rome that today became available to hundreds of millions of internet users around the world.

Users of Google Earth can now see the city, down to the last aqueduct and arena, just as it looked at midday on April 1 AD320. They can float through the Forum, past the platform or "rostra" from which Cicero once declaimed, admire the statues, read the inscriptions, pry into palaces, and then slip round to the Colosseum or whisk over to the Circus Maximus where the ancient Romans held their chariot races.

There, the virtual traveller will find, not the slightly disappointing, though enormous, oval expanse of grass that confronts the real tourist, but the huge, walled stadium that tourists are forced to conjure up from their imagination.

It is the "Rome of [the emperor] Constantine in which everything is new", said Google Earth's chief technologist, Michael T Jones, at the presentation in Rome's city hall. "It's new. It's modern. It's beautiful".

All that the awe-inspiringly detailed reconstruction lacks is people. Their absence gives a slightly eerie feel to the stadiums and temples, the marketplaces and thoroughfares of classical Rome.

Some 6,700 digitally reconstructed structures have gone towards making up Google Earth's latest layer, which can be superimposed on its images of the city. Users can enter ten of the buildings, including monuments such the Colosseum, where the software enables them to marvel at the architecture and even gaze on details like marble floors whose exact shape and pattern are known because their remains have survived to the present.

The first concerted effort to "recreate" the ancient imperial capital was made by an Italian architect, Italo Gismondi. Three years before his death in 1974, he finished a vast, plaster model of ancient Rome in 1:250 scale that can be seen in the city's Museo della Civilta Romana.

Gismondi's research played an important role in the digital project, which was begun in 1997 by a teacher at the University of Virginia, Bernard Frischer. After 10 years of work and collaboration between his own university, UCLA in California and Milan's Politecnico, Rome Reborn – made up of 50m polygons (the building blocks of three-dimensional computer graphics) – was unveiled last year.

The job of transferring it to the web was shared between Google's 3D unit and a Rome-based firm, Past Perfect Productions, run by a Briton, Joel Myers. He said today it had taken 15 people the best part of a year to complete the operation.

Myers said Rome Reborn was "the largest and most complete reconstruction of an ancient city". Its creator had chosen 320 AD "because it was Rome at its moment of greatest splendour as far as its architecture is concerned. If you went back to periods of more historical interest, like Julius Caesar's, you would not have the Colosseum, for example."

Rome's mayor, Gianni Alemanno, said he hoped the project would get over a "problem of communication" that the city had noted with its visitors who increasingly demanded something more than just ruins. "Obviously, providing a monumental, archaeological reality is fundamental", he said. "But for many people it's insufficient, it's too remote."

And, in a sense, it is much smaller too. Of the real classical Rome, just 300 buildings – and, in most cases, their remains -- have survived.


I haven't checked it out yet (Google Earth gives my slow connection heartburn), but soon enough I'll take the risk!

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