We are at the Wikipedia

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We are at the Wikipedia

Postby Gnaeus Dionysius Draco on Sat Jul 17, 2004 7:41 pm

As of today, SVR has its own lemma at the Wikipedia, the biggest online encyclopedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Societas_Via_Romana

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Postby Lucius Tyrrhenus Garrulus on Sun Jul 18, 2004 6:49 am

Salve!
Very nice... That's the kind of simple promotions which could bring in new members.

The only thing I would change is this:
The Societas Via Romana [1] (http://www.societasviaromana.org) is an online organisation that focuses on the discussion about and the revival of Antiquity in its aspect that could still apply to the modern world.
to
The Societas Via Romana [1] (http://www.societasviaromana.org) is an online organisation which focuses on discussion and the revival of antiquity. Especially in those aspects which still apply to the modern world.

But I haven't been to school in years. So my grammar may be off.
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Postby Aulus Dionysius Mencius on Sun Jul 18, 2004 9:33 am

Salvete omnes!

Yes, it looks quite impressive. I especially liked the 'scholarly membership' comment. It is good to know that enthousiast can produce high quality essays, projects and postings. ( I think Piscinus' postings have something to do with this comment :wink: , his motto is sapere aude, after all)

And of course that svr linkeage through other sites is on the rise...

As a final note, I agree with Lucius on the intro. His version is somewhat more direct, certainly his last sentence.

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Postby Gnaeus Dionysius Draco on Sun Jul 18, 2004 11:27 am

Salvete amici,

Well, anyone can actually change the content of the article at will. It's really easy. I'll look into the suggested changes later today...

Valete,
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Postby Aulus Dionysius Mencius on Fri Aug 13, 2004 6:17 pm

Salvete omnes

It seems that we are at Wikipeda's discussion-for-deletion page.

How dare they! :evil:
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Postby Gnaeus Dionysius Draco on Sat Aug 14, 2004 12:14 am

Well... if anyone of you has an account at the Wikipedia, please vote against deletion.

I think this vote for deletion is the result of a spiteful act of NR, after they saw their article deleted. This is really small-minded.

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Postby Curio Agelastus on Sat Aug 14, 2004 10:21 pm

Salvete,

For what reasons is an organisation put up for deletion? After all, surely the Wikipedia is an encyclopaedia, and should therefore include both SVR and NR, whatever the Wikipedia team's personal thoughts on either organisation?

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Postby Anonymous on Sun Aug 15, 2004 2:18 am

Marcus Scribonius Curio wrote:Salvete,

For what reasons is an organisation put up for deletion? After all, surely the Wikipedia is an encyclopaedia, and should therefore include both SVR and NR, whatever the Wikipedia team's personal thoughts on either organisation?

Bene valete,
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One of their criteria for deletion is self-promotion; they argued that SVR is not relevant enough for an encyclopaedia.
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Postby Gnaeus Dionysius Draco on Sun Aug 15, 2004 12:55 pm

Salvete,

Well, I would consider this a valid argument if there weren't articles on the silliest of things. What is the relevance of entire articles devoted to Tolkien's Dwarf language? The article can hardly be considered self-promotion. It just says what and where we are...

Most people want to have it deleted because the topic of micronations, to which many editors of the Wikipedia seem to be allergic, has cast a shadow over us. I find this issue rather annoying. I also received a mail from one of the people there who confirmed by suspicion that this is all part of an internal war there between two or three users.

It's odd to note however that one Stuart Smith (previously known in the OP as Festus/Nerva) came to our defence.

Valete,
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Postby Curio Agelastus on Sun Aug 15, 2004 11:38 pm

Salve,

That is odd. Why the hell would Stuart Smith defend us? He despises us and mocks us at every opportunity. :?

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Postby Marcus Lupinius Paulus on Sun Feb 19, 2006 6:46 pm

Curio Agelastus wrote:Salve,

That is odd. Why the hell would Stuart Smith defend us? He despises us and mocks us at every opportunity. :?

Bene vale,
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Actually, that is not true. I *was* skeptical when SVR first started, but beyond that I thought SVR was a good thing and even carried an advertising banner on my now-defunct webpage.
And I was sorry to see the SVR article on Wikipedia deleted. Especially considering some of the nonsense they allow to remain!

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Postby Curio Agelastus on Thu Feb 23, 2006 6:20 pm

My apologies, Stuart. I stand corrected. :) What are you doing with yourself now?

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Postby Marcus Lupinius Paulus on Fri Feb 24, 2006 3:23 am

Salve Curio!

No problem, and no offense taken. I don't blame you for thinking that actually. :D

I've just been working, getting bossed by the Imperatrix {Latin for "wife"}
and hanging out in the Roman Outpost, renewing a friendship with Aldus Marius, getting to know Piscinus and Ericius better. It is amazing to see just how stupid old feuds really were.

But how have you been doing?

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Postby Anonymous on Mon Mar 27, 2006 5:58 pm

Gnæus Dionysius Draco wrote:And I was sorry to see the SVR article on Wikipedia deleted. Especially considering some of the nonsense they allow to remain!
Bongiorno.

As a Wikipedia administrator, as far as I can tell articles are usually kept or deleted depending on how trivial they are. There's a very thin borderline, and that's why they have to have a vote each time...

There are lots of good Roman history articles that need improving. For example, I just expanded http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aius_Locutius with a few paragraphs of inscriptions, but it's kind of confused because I'm kind of confused about it. I did a Google search to find people who were talking about this altar, and I found this way-cool forum so here I am. :oops:

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Postby Horatius Piscinus on Tue Mar 28, 2006 7:16 am

Salve Aule Catte

Welcome to our humble little group. You wrote this article? The citation from E. Courtney I recognize, for such general formulae when invoking Di incerti. And the four columns, discovered in the 1860's, thought to be from when Augustus refounded the City while expanding the pomerium. But why is this particular altar thought to be associated with Aius Locutius? The shrine was supposedly on the Via Nova above where stood the Temple of Vesta [Livy 5.32.6-7; 5.50.5]. No connection with those pillars or with Carandini's later discovery of the four graves of those commemorated by the pillars.

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Postby Anonymous on Thu Mar 30, 2006 5:47 am

Oh, dear! I was worried about that, but all I had to go on were these two turn-of-the-century sources, and a blurry photo. So, does this altar have a name? I could move it to an article called "Altar to the Unknown God," but that would be fanciful.

Gratias ago...
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Postby Horatius Piscinus on Wed Apr 05, 2006 2:47 pm

Salve Catte

Oh, I wouldn't move it just yet. A nice little page, and you can always edit a wiki easily enough. I assume you found something that identified that photo as an altar for Aius Locatus, I just wonder what was your source. There is a lot of misinformation that seems to be repeated over the Internet, and btw don't always trust what I write either. Most of the time I have some source to back up what I post, but it's always good to double check. So what turn of the century sources are you using? And maybe you could post a quote for us.

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Postby Primus Aurelius Timavus on Wed Apr 05, 2006 11:24 pm

Salvete,

Some sodales (including myself until very recently) may not know that there is a Wiki Classical Dictionary which can be found at

http://www.ancientlibrary.com/wcd/Main_Page

Valete,

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Postby Anonymous on Sat Apr 22, 2006 6:12 pm

First off, thank you for the link, Prime.

Horatius Piscinus wrote:So what turn of the century sources are you using? And maybe you could post a quote for us.
I was using Rodolfo Lanciani who seemed reliable enough. The other source was talking about misidentification but it was an encyclopedia so it was hard to understand.

I would love to expand more articles about Roman religion, if I knew some sources on it that were especially reknowned and reliable... I have the Boston Public Library at my disposal. :)

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Postby Horatius Piscinus on Sun Apr 23, 2006 9:47 am

Salve bene Aule Catte

Oh, Lanciani, yes, still a valuable source of information, and Mommsen is still a starting point, if not always agreed with today. Modern sources...erh, well, a good little book to include is R. Ross Holloway, The Archaeology of Early Rome and Latium, 1994. Not a book on the religio Romana but some excellent observations on the use and misuse of Roman archaeology when trying to interpret certain aspects of the religions of Roma antiqua. A book I recomend is The Religions of Rome, by Mary Beard, John North, and Simon Price, 1998. I also like Beard's work on Roman Priests and North did an article on Roman sacrifices, I forget exactly where, but those three authors are some of the best in English today on Roman religious institutions. T. J. Cornell's The Beginnings of Rome, is an interesting read. Read Holloway along with Cornell, though. Cornell is an historian rather than an archaeologist, and he takes a position that Livy is essentially accurate. Livy records what were the Roman traditions of his own time, using sources that even Livy questioned sometimes. Livy I take as traditional, what we might call the mos maiorum in a certain sense, but he is not historically accurate in a modern sense. Lanciani has to be taken with a grain of salt, too, and so Holloway's observations will help balance out older authors like Lanciani who assumed too much about Livy as a source. John Scheid is a good modern author to read on the religion of Rome. (I don't always agree with the way he puts some things.) If you begin to research on the religio Romana you are bound to run into George Dumazil, still, with all his fallacious arguments. He remains popular with people on the Internet, so a lot of misinformation is repeated. Best to read Momigliano, too, the major opponent of Dumazil's fallacies. Carandini is currently heading the latest excavations in Rome itself, making exciting discoveries. I haven't been able to read much of Carandini as he is not readily available over here in the boonies of Ohio. I have read some of his work, and some papers by his students and colleagues, although my Italian is not quite up to understanding all of what I read from them. J. M. C. Toynbee's Death and Burial in the Roman World, 1971, is still the best available book on that subject. There are two books available on the Roman calendar, H. H. Scullard, following Dumazil, wrote Festivals and Ceremonies of the Roman Republic, 1981. I prefer W. W. Fowler's The Roman Festivals of the Republic, 1899, a bit old, out of date, but I prefer his approach of comparative religion, taking after Frazer, rather than Dumezil's fantasies about a mythological base of Roman religion in a mythical Indo-European culture that never existed! (Don't get me started.) There is not a lot available yet, as the subject is still relatively new, but Roman traditions developed out of the same cultural base as the traditions of the Italic tribes. I just think if one is going to make comparisons one should look at the Italic tribes rather than create tenuous links to India and its religious traditions. Unfortunately, in English, E. T. Salmon's Samnium and the Samnites, 1967, might be the only thing you'll find in a public library, and he relies on Livy, but covers Samnite religion well enough to give some insight to Roman traditions as well. And for insight, Robert Turcan's valuable little book, The Gods of Ancient Rome, translated in 2000, and some of his other books as well. Sometimes Turcan defers to the opinion of Dumezil, but I think Turcan is perhaps the most insightful author on the religio Romana. And another author who I especially enjoy is Ramsey Marshall. His Paganism in the Roman Empire, 1981, is another that cautions against the assumptions of some historians in the face of archaeological evidence. BPL or the universities in your area should have those titles, and they can lead you on to other sources.

Some of our European sodales can recommend other books as well. I haven't heard of some of the authors that have been recommended to me. They're just not available where I live, but might be in Boston.

Currently what I am reading is T. Habinek's The World of Roman Song: From Ritualized Speech to Social Order,, 2005, from John Hopkins University. Quite interesting, at least to me, as he touches on a subject that I have tried to explain in some classes I've taught. Maybe when I am through his book I will be better able to explain. Difficult reading though.

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