Quotes database

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Quotes database

Postby Gnaeus Dionysius Draco on Tue Apr 29, 2003 6:42 pm

Salvete omnes philosophi,

I would like to start a project here, one that's easy and where everyone can contribute. I'd like to assemble a quotes library of famous Romans and Greeks, or of people who made memorable quotes regarding ancient Mediterranean civilisations. They can be serious, philosophical, funny or just plain absurd and funny.

So please, share them with us, pass us some quotes!!

Valete bene,
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Quote

Postby Primus Aurelius Timavus on Tue Apr 29, 2003 11:06 pm

Here is a nice easy one in Latin to start out. It is certainly philosophical as well.

It is an epigraph that used to adorn a bridge that connected the ancient city of Aquileia with one of its many necropoli. The inscription is in the National Museum of Aquileia (on the north Adriatic coast of Italy).

Quod es ego fui
Et tu eris quod sum
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Postby Tarquinius Dionysius on Wed Apr 30, 2003 3:15 pm

"In Cauda Venenum" :wink:
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Postby Gnaeus Dionysius Draco on Wed Apr 30, 2003 3:34 pm

Salvete!

Here's a few from the top of my head.

* homo homini lupus - Tacitus (?) (man is a wolf for the man)
* pecunia non olet - Vespasianus (money doesn't stink)
* alea iacta est - Caesar (the die is cast)
* veni, vidi, vici - Caesar (I came, I saw, I won)
* si vis pacem, para bellum - Cicero (?) (if you want peace, prepare for war)
* mens sana in corpore sano - Iuvenalis (a healthy mind in a healthy body)
* festina lente (make haste slowly)
* verba volant, scripta manent (words fly, writings remain)
* do ut des (I give for you would give)

Valete bene!
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Quotes: Another place to look

Postby Aldus Marius on Wed Apr 30, 2003 10:54 pm

Salvete, viatores:

There are several more interesting quotes in the Collegium Latinum; perhaps we could consolidate the two listings.

In fide (See, Draco? --I'm teachable, really I am!!), >({|:-D
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Postby Horatius Piscinus on Thu May 01, 2003 1:41 pm

Salvete

There are so many applicable quotations, and so confusing at times to go through them all, that I think rather than consolidating lists of quotes we should consider different lists for each collegia. Not all the quotes given so far would I consider philosophical quotes. They may apply in other collegia though.

Gnæus Dionysius Draco wrote:* festina lente (make haste slowly)


On this one, the author was Augustus, widely adopted as a motto during the Renaissance.

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Postby Gnaeus Dionysius Draco on Thu May 01, 2003 3:08 pm

Salve Piscine,

Yes, not all quotes are philosophical but if there was one collegium under which the topic fitted I believe 'twas this one. Besides, as rector I can be chauvinistic about my own collegium can't I? ;)

Thanks for the authorship on "festina lente", I had always assumed that it was just a general proverb.

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Ovid Quote

Postby Primus Aurelius Timavus on Thu May 01, 2003 7:23 pm

Here's another philosophical quote:

TEMPUS EDAX RERUM
Time, the devourer of all things.

(Ovid)
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Postby Anonymous on Thu May 01, 2003 9:02 pm

Here are two I like

"Nothing happens to any man which he is not formed by nature to bear."
Marcus Aurelius


"Accept the things to which fate binds you, and love the people with whom fate brings you together, but do so with all your heart. "
Marcus Aurelius
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Postby Gnaeus Dionysius Draco on Fri May 02, 2003 3:34 pm

Salvete Ovidi et Messalina,

Thanks for your contributions. If you know more, keep 'em comin' ;).

Valete,
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Postby Tiberius Dionysius Draco on Fri May 09, 2003 10:51 pm

Avete Romani,

"Tu quoque fili mi?" - Julius Caesar (You too, my son?"
"Horum omnium fortissimi sunt Belgae" - Julius Caesar (Of all the tribes, the Belgians are the bravest.)
"Cave canem" (Beware of the dog)

Valete bene,

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Postby Primus Aurelius Timavus on Fri May 09, 2003 11:33 pm

I always thought that Julius Caesar's last words were

"Et tu Brute?"
Where "et" has the force of "even". This usage also appears famously in the passage from Vergil

"Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes".
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Postby Gnaeus Dionysius Draco on Sat May 10, 2003 11:18 am

Salve Tergeste;

Here it's always assumed that it was "tu quoque, fili mi?". But they are not mutually exclusive, methinks ;).

However, researchers believe that Caesar said his last words in Greek, which would have been "kai su, teknon?".

Thanks for the quotes, I've begun assembling them into a html page yesterday.

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Postby Horatius Piscinus on Sat May 10, 2003 8:07 pm

Salvete

Gnæus Dionysius Draco wrote: researchers believe that Caesar said his last words in Greek, which would have been "kai su, teknon?".


That is what I have read too, that his words were in Greek , translated then into Latin as "Et tu, mi fili" I do not read Greek but my understanding was that teknon only possibly implied a son and could have meant something else. So where did the "Et tu, Brute" come from?

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Postby Gnaeus Dionysius Draco on Sat May 10, 2003 8:24 pm

Salve Piscine,

It's been a while since I had any Greek, but from my understanding "teknon" is the past participle of "titenai" (hellenists please correct me if I'm wrong!) which means "to bear; to bring forth; to produce (in an organic sense)". So "teknon" means "that which has been produced, which is born."

So, "me teknon" should be "my 'product'" (ugly translation but hey ;)). Has Caesar used the word for son, "huios", one could have supposed that he meant son in a spiritual sense or perhaps an adoptive sense, but I don't think there's any doubt about the word "teknon".

I have no idea where "et tu, Brute" comes from. Perhaps a different source reporting on Caesar's death?

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Postby Primus Aurelius Timavus on Sat May 10, 2003 8:28 pm

Hmmm. A little searching on the Web has shown that the phrase "Et tu, Brute" is from Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, rather than from any ancient sources (unless good old William had some ancient sources that are now lost to us). Since the use of "et" in this way is a bit unusual, it shows that William had a good grasp of his Latin.
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Postby Gnaeus Dionysius Draco on Wed May 21, 2003 5:39 pm

Salvete,

Gratias tibi ago Corunciane. :) I especially liked the Tibullus quote.

Mi Tergeste, I had missed your post there. Yes, Shakespeare was definitely latinate - more latinate than any of us here, I think. Renaissance artists and writers were expected to be able to at least fluently write Latin (and if possible, Greek and Hebrew too). I wonder what they would think of SVR ;).

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Postby Q. C. Locatus Barbatus on Mon Nov 24, 2003 4:09 pm

Salvete!

I'm re-opening this topic for personal reasons... For one of my courses (ethics) I have to collect quotes (especially on ethic problems). Does anyone know some more?

Valete,

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