Translation Please!

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Translation Please!

Postby Anonymous on Tue Sep 13, 2005 4:29 pm

Salvete Omnes!

Could someone tell me how I could get translations for this into Latin?

"The blessings of the Gods upon thee" or something similar.
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Postby Primus Aurelius Timavus on Tue Sep 13, 2005 9:46 pm

Our colleague Marcus Horatius Piscinus is fond of saying,

Di Deaeque te semper ament

Which means something like, "May the gods and goddesses always love you".

Tergestus
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Postby Anonymous on Tue Sep 13, 2005 10:05 pm

Primus Aurelius Tergestus wrote:Our colleague Marcus Horatius Piscinus is fond of saying,

Di Deaeque te semper ament

Which means something like, "May the gods and goddesses always love you".

Tergestus


GRATIAS TIBI Tergeste!
Last edited by Anonymous on Wed Sep 14, 2005 7:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Further help!

Postby Aldus Marius on Wed Sep 14, 2005 2:54 am

Salve, Calve...(I did not just say that!) >({|;-)

...et Welcome to the Societas Via Romana, the Society of the Roman Way! Aldus Marius Peregrinus at your service.

I'm not one for long-winded intros, I'm afraid; my self-concept was never that organized. We'll get to know each other if you stick around long enough. Right now I just wanted to let you know that in this very Collegium, about four threads south of here, there is a topic called Latin Tips and Tricks. In it are a few rather complete listings of our local vernacular, which I call "Board-Latin", and the phrases you are most likely to encounter here. These should be enough to get you up and running.

My portion of the thread is comprehensive, but grammatically flawed...it was not one of my Good Latin weeks. (Mine comes and goes.) However, it is as good a demonstration as any that you don't have to know all the ropes in order to have something useful to say!

(My thanks again to our Aediles, who've heard a few of my rants; they still let me log in anyway.) >({(:-)

In amicitia et fide (In Friendship and Faith),
Aldus Marius Peregrinus.
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Postby Q Valerius on Wed Sep 14, 2005 5:55 am

Tergeste,

When did benedico enter Latin vocabulary? And usually sacred epithets only referred to the male gods, usually, such as "Di immortales!" "Immortal Gods!"

I would prefer to say, that is, if benedico can be attested early enough, Dei te benedicant.

Checking Perseus Project, it appears that the Vulgate was the first use of it...
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Re: Further help!

Postby Anonymous on Wed Sep 14, 2005 3:04 pm

GRATIAS TIBI Marius

Marius Peregrine wrote:Salve, Calve...(I did not just say that!) >({|;-)

...et Welcome to the Societas Via Romana, the Society of the Roman Way! Aldus Marius Peregrinus at your service.

I'm not one for long-winded intros, I'm afraid; my self-concept was never that organized. We'll get to know each other if you stick around long enough. Right now I just wanted to let you know that in this very Collegium, about four threads south of here, there is a topic called Latin Tips and Tricks. In it are a few rather complete listings of our local vernacular, which I call "Board-Latin", and the phrases you are most likely to encounter here. These should be enough to get you up and running.

My portion of the thread is comprehensive, but grammatically flawed...it was not one of my Good Latin weeks. (Mine comes and goes.) However, it is as good a demonstration as any that you don't have to know all the ropes in order to have something useful to say!

(My thanks again to our Aediles, who've heard a few of my rants; they still let me log in anyway.) >({(:-)

In amicitia et fide (In Friendship and Faith),
Anonymous
 

Postby Primus Aurelius Timavus on Wed Sep 14, 2005 5:00 pm

Salve Scerio,

I don't know about benedico. If its first use is in the Vulgate, it might be too late (and too Christian!) for Caldus' intended use.

On the other hand, benedicant would be closer to what Caldus originally wanted.
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Postby Anonymous on Wed Sep 14, 2005 7:53 pm

Salvete Omnes!

Where did benedico come into the question? Im lost again..lol
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Postby Primus Aurelius Timavus on Wed Sep 14, 2005 8:16 pm

It means blessed ("I bless" actually). So it is closer to what you originally proposed than the quote that I gave you.
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Postby Anonymous on Thu Sep 15, 2005 7:41 pm

Primus Aurelius Tergestus wrote:It means blessed ("I bless" actually). So it is closer to what you originally proposed than the quote that I gave you.


Ahh,so Dei te benedicant is what Im looking for and not Di Deaeque te semper ament ...
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Postby Primus Aurelius Timavus on Thu Sep 15, 2005 8:54 pm

Yes, the translation would be, "May the gods bless you."

As Scerio wrote, however, benedico seems to have only first appeared in the Christian era (the Vulgate was the first Latin bible). So you might prefer ament to benedicant even if the meaning is not exactly what you asked for....
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Postby Anonymous on Thu Sep 15, 2005 9:13 pm

Primus Aurelius Tergestus wrote:Yes, the translation would be, "May the gods bless you."

As Scerio wrote, however, benedico seems to have only first appeared in the Christian era (the Vulgate was the first Latin bible). So you might prefer ament to benedicant even if the meaning is not exactly what you asked for....


GRATIAS TIBI Tergeste for making my understanding better.

May the Gods bless you with long life and long love,for the kind help.
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Postby Anonymous on Sat Sep 17, 2005 5:02 pm

I tried an online English to Latin Dictionary to no Avail,so I ask here:

What is the Latin for="Hail, or All Praise to Diana"
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Postby Primus Aurelius Timavus on Sat Sep 17, 2005 7:46 pm

AVE DIANA
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Postby Anonymous on Sun Sep 18, 2005 12:05 am

Primus Aurelius Tergestus wrote:AVE DIANA


Thanks Tergeste! I thought that was it,but wasnt sure if it was the proper Old Latin..
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Postby Q Valerius on Tue Sep 20, 2005 4:27 am

Ave(te) indeed is the proper Latin. Also, Tergeste, if I'm not mistaken, benedico may have been in the Vetus Latina, so it may well have its roots in the vulgar community around the turn of the millennium. But unfortunately, I don't have any of the Old Latin manuscripts, or even their contents, but then again, no secular author after the Latin Bible is said to have used it (at least, according to Perseus).

Ah, well, si vis.

Vale bene,

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