Another translation request

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Another translation request

Postby Primus Aurelius Timavus on Wed Jan 11, 2006 6:19 am

Salvete,

I've received a request to translate "Persist and go forward" into the first person plural subjunctive (in other words, "Let us persist and go forward". The requester is unsure whether persist or persevere, and their respective Latin cognates, best represent his meaning. Any takers?

Vobis gratias ago.
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Postby Primus Aurelius Timavus on Thu Jan 12, 2006 7:18 pm

C'mon, none of you current Latin students can help me out with this easy request?!!!???
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Say What...?

Postby Aldus Marius on Fri Jan 13, 2006 12:01 am

Salve, mi Tergeste...

It's only "easy" if you leave out the mind-reading component... If the requester himself is not quite sure of what he wants said, isn't it a bit early for him to ask us to render it into Latin?

I had a heck of a time with "May the Force be with you". Turned out "force" in lingua Anglice has about umpteen different meanings, and each one is represented by a different Latin word! So what was the nature of the Force? Was it power, was it might? Was it strength of body, or strength of character? Was it the ability to do things through sheer will? --None of the first three Star Wars flicks really explained it; we just saw it in action. So I came up with Potentia tecum (vobiscum), as my personal vision of the Force was the inherent cosmic potential one could tap into to make things happen. I have since usually seen it rendered as Vis tecum (vobiscum), a reflection, I suppose, of others' concept of it being a raw power source.

Now, I was just doing this for my own edification, and it took this much pondering to come up with something that felt sorta right. To do it for someone else, especially one I didn't know well (or at all)...? Na; he'd have to bring his own thinkwork or forever be unhappy with the result.

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Postby Primus Aurelius Timavus on Sat Jan 14, 2006 11:51 pm

Alright, let's go with "persevere and go forward". Am I correct in saying that the first person plural present subjunctive of persevere is perseveamus? And what verb should I use for "go forward"?
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Postby Iacobulus on Mon Jan 16, 2006 9:02 pm

Primus Aurelius Tergestus wrote:Alright, let's go with "persevere and go forward". Am I correct in saying that the first person plural present subjunctive of persevere is perseveamus? And what verb should I use for "go forward"?


Break out your lexicon my friend. persevero, persevare, perseveravi, perseveratum is a first conjugation verb with the theme vowel being "a". Thusly, the hortatory subjunctive would be perseveremus.

The theme vowels "-ea-" are added to the present subjunctive forms for second conjugation verbs, such as video (videamus)

There are a variety of ways to convey that sentiment. Some Latinists will get wrapped around the axel a bit trying to pick the perfect verb, but cognates are often very judicious words to use.

perseveremus is a fine word to use. It conveys precisely the meaning of it's English derivative (which isn't always the case).

However "go forward" is trickier. There are numerous words that can convey this. Nevertheless, I think procedo, procedere, processi, processum would be the best choice. It can convey both the literal and figurative meaning of "go forward," i.e. to physically move forward or to make progress.

I think a tight copulative connective -que would work, but the regular old et would suffice as well. Not to mention atque, ac, necnon, etc.

So I would suggest Perseveremus procedamusque or Perseveremus et procedamus.
Quis fallere possit amantem? ~ P. Vergilius Maro
Quidquid bene dictum est ab ullo, meum est ~L. Anneus Seneca
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Postby Primus Aurelius Timavus on Mon Jan 16, 2006 9:59 pm

TGA, Iacobule!!

:D
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Postby Iacobulus on Tue Jan 17, 2006 5:38 am

Nihil est, Primi :wink:
Quis fallere possit amantem? ~ P. Vergilius Maro
Quidquid bene dictum est ab ullo, meum est ~L. Anneus Seneca
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Postby Q Valerius on Thu Jan 19, 2006 9:55 pm

Just wanted to point out that Perservemus et procedamus literally renders to "Let us perservere and go forth." If you wanted it as a command, you could likewise do "perservera et procede".
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Postby Iacobulus on Fri Jan 20, 2006 2:25 am

Q. Valerius Scerio wrote:Just wanted to point out that Perservemus et procedamus literally renders to "Let us perservere and go forth." If you wanted it as a command, you could likewise do "perservera et procede".


Yes, but Primus said that it had to be as such. Using the hortatory is, well, encouraging! I think using the hortatory, or even the jussive (perseveres procedasque - may you persevere and go forward) adds a bit more an erudite literary quality to it. Using the imperative would give a more curt, coat-of-arms feel, but I suppose the difference is splitting hairs, the message is what matters I guess. Non refert!
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